• Past Events
  • Resilience Archives Showcase + Visibility Project Book Launch (June 6, 2017)

    RESILIENCE ARCHIVES SHOWCASE + EXHIBITION
    + VISIBILITY PROJECT BOOK LAUNCH

    RESILIENCE ARCHIVES SHOWCASE

    June 6th is the launch of the Resilience Archives digital history tour alongside a multi-disciplinary event that includes:

      • A performance showcase of LGBTQ AAPI storytellers led by producer Kat Evasco.
      • An exhibition of large format portraits from the Visibility Project
      • Historical personal archives will also be exhibited
      • Short films from oral history interviews of the Visibility Project, API Equality – Northern California’s Dragon Fruit Project, and summer workshops of the Resilience Archives will be setup at listening stations

    VISIBILITY PROJECT BOOK RELEASE

    This dynamic evening includes a book launch from the Visibility Project!
    A series of intimate portraits focused on the queer Asian American women and trans community. This retrospective of the Visibility Project lifts up this traditionally marginalized community, through carefully, mindfully, and intentionally moving the spotlight onto the fierce and proud participants of the project. It includes over 80 portraits of QAPIs from New York to Little Rock to Chicago and of course, San Francisco.

    Visibility Project Director, Mia Nakano, and collaborators Monna Wong and Tracy Ngyuen developed educational curriculum to help educators utilize the Visibility Project photos and extensive oral history film interviews as teaching tools. The lesson plans are meant as prompts for folks as young as 11 through adulthood. It begins with key guiding principals to cultivate a safe intentional space to teach and learn.

    DATE + TIMES
    Tuesday, June 6th, 2017
    6:00-8:30 (Reception + book release)
    6:30-7:15 (Performance + LGBTQ AAPI digital history tour launch)

    LOCATION
    Intersection for the Arts
    901 Mission Street, Suite 306
    San Francisco, CA 94103

    ACCESSIBILITY
    The venue is wheelchair accessible.

    SLIDING SCALE DONATIONS + YOUR DONATIONS DOUBLE!
    This event is free, however we are taking sliding scale donations to help raise funds for an Oakland production of this showcase. Artists, Mia Nakano and Kat Evasco, are recipients of the East Bay Fund for Artists, which means that all donations will be matched up to $3100! Please help us meet our goal!

    TICKET LIST
    We will have a list of donors who have donated prior to the event. We will also be taking cash, check, and credit donations the day of. We encourage you to get tickets and books before the event, to help us track attendance and quantities of books needed to print.

    TICKET & BOOK SALE DONATIONS
    All donations for tickets and books are tax deductible, you will receive an email mail notification of your donation in a few weeks.

  • Past Events
  • THE CULTURAL IMPACT OF PAINTING & PRINTED MEDIA: Artist lecture & creative lab

    Painting-printed-media

    THE CULTURAL IMPACT OF PAINTING & PRINTED MEDIA:
    Artist lecture & creative lab

    We ensure our histories are not lost by documenting them and Lenore Chinn has been documenting the broader LGBTQ community in San Francisco for over 30 years. Her larger photo-realist paintings began as community portraits, of her friends really, and are now a beautiful and sometimes haunting history. Lenore wraps up this series of workshop with a special artist lecture. She’ll discuss some of the highlights of her career as a painter and social justice founder of some of the most influential LGBTQ and Asian arts organizations in the Bay Area including the Lesbians in the Visual Arts, Queer Cultural Center, and Asian American Women Artists.

    We’ll include an open Q&A section to open up the floor for conversation. Also view printed works inspired by the stories from the Dragonfruit Project and see works from other LGBTQ AAPI artists. The lecture will immediately be followed by an open creative lab where we’ll provide materials to create works around the LGBTQ AAPI communities and stories. You’ll see art that’s already been created and share space with other working artists. This is a great opportunity to share creative space with other working LGBTQ AAPI artists.

    PROVIDED: A variety of creative materials will be provided to create works in class paper, pens, scanner, printer, glue, tape, scissors, etc.

    INSTRUCTORS

    Lenore Chinn: Artist
    Mia Nakano: Director, Visibility Project

    We will be requesting that all participants sign release forms at the beginning of each workshop allowing us to publish scans, audio stories, photos, artwork and other materials created in the workshop as a part of the Resilience Archives at www.resiliencearchives.com.

    DATE & TIME

    Sunday, August 7th
    10am – 2pm

    LOCATION

    Oakland Asian Cultural Center
    Auditorium
    388 9th St. #290
    Oakland, CA  94607

    CLASS LIMIT

    30 people

    This workshop is open to the LGBTQ AAPI community, family, friends, and allies.

    PROVIDED: A variety of creative materials will be provided to create works in class paper, pens, scanner, printer, glue, tape, scissors, etc.

    BRING:

    • Photos, papers, pens, any materials you want to create work with.
    • A lot of materials will be provided, but bring your own items if you have a specific medium or  piece you want to create.

    View the videos and stories of the Dragonfruit and Visibility Project as inspiration!


    ABOUT THE RESLIENCE ARCHIVES

    LGBTQ Asian Pacific Americans have made historic contributions to art, labor rights, and immigration reform, but their stories are truncated footnotes, if mentioned at all. APAs are the fastest growing population in the U.S., but have one of the lowest amounts of visibility in media.

    With little to no LGBTQ AAPI representation in popular culture or history, it is often up to these individuals to seek out their own community in order to hear stories and experiences. This process can be a huge struggle, resulting in conflicts of identity, religion, familial obligation, and self worth. LGBTQ AAPIs face intense discrimination and racism from mainstream LGBTQ communities, and must often choose to be LGBTQ or Asian.

    The Resilience Archives will exist online as community created history through photographs, slideshows, audio clips, multi-media, and much more. The first iteration of the project starts in the SF Bay Area with a series of four free workshops that teach practical, technical, and artistic skills in different mediums: archiving, storytelling, print media, performance arts, and film practices.

    WHO CAN PARTICIPATE

    Workshops are open to LGBTQ AAPI community, family, and allies. Due to limited space in some workshops, priority will be given to LGBTQ AAPI community members. Please view individual workshop pages to see if there are any restrictions.

    ABOUT THE COLLABORATION

    Resilience Archives is a collaboration between API Equality – Northern California (APIENC) and Visibility Project Director, artist Mia Nakano. APIENC and the Visibility Project are a part of the Asian Americans for Civil Rights and Equality Network (AACRE).

    This collaboration was made possible by the San Francisco Arts Commission’s Artists and Communities in Partnership Grant.

  • Past Events
  • FILMMAKING & DOCUMENTING ORAL HISTORY

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    FILMMAKING AND DOCUMENTING ORAL HISTORY (2-days)

    Participants will learn how to create storytelling videos and participate in a 2-day hands on film-making workshop led by filmmaker, Mia Nakano (Visibility Project Director & Hyphen co-founder) and supported by emerging community filmmakers Sal Tran and MLin.

    Day 1: Saturday, July 23rd (10am – 1pm)
    Participants will learn best practices of lighting, audio, and interview techniques. Learn the best position for a boom mic and also what a friggin boom mic is! Get handy takeaway tips around composition, exposure, model releases, and publication transparency. A professional video setup will be used as a demonstration tool that will be put into practice on day 2. Tips will be given throughout the day that are applicable to all filmmaking practices whether you have a fancy dslr or video camera or are working with a smart phone.

    Day 2: Sunday, July 24th (must pre-register for a 30 minute filmmaking slot)
    The second day will be dedicated to producing interview segments with both interviewees and interviewers. Priority will be given to participants who have attended the first day of “Documenting Oral Histories Through Filmmaking” workshop. Participants will register online for a 30 minute filmmaking slot and get hands on experience behind the camera! Participants will come with an interviewee to create the RAW footage of an oral history story! Mia Nakano will be the technical advisor on set to ensure the production runs smoothly

    LEAD INSTRUCTOR

    Mia Nakano: Director, Visibility Project

    FILMMAKING ASSISTANTS

    MLin: Community Organizer, API Equality – Northern California
    Sal Tran: Filmmaker

    We will be requesting that all participants sign release forms at the beginning of each workshop allowing us to publish scans, audio stories, photos, artwork and other materials created in the workshop as a part of the Resilience Archives at www.resiliencearchives.com.

    DAY 1

    DATE & TIME (Day 1)

    Saturday, July 23rd
    10am – 2pm

    LOCATION (Day 1)

    San Francisco Public Library
    Learning Studio
    100 Larkin Street
    San Francisco, CA  94102

    CLASS LIMIT (Day 1)

    12 people

    DAY 2: Filmmaking (must pre-register for a 30 minute slot)

    DATE & TIME (Day 2)

    Sunday, July 24th
    10am – 6pm

    LOCATION (Day 2)

    Strut Space
    3rd Floor
    470 Castro St,
    San Francisco, CA  94114

    CLASS LIMIT (Day 2)

    8 people/slots

    Open to the LGBTQ AAPI community, family, friends, and allies, however priority will be given to the LGBTQ AAPI community

    BRING:

    • Something to take notes with

    Watch some of the videos from the Visibility Project.

    This workshop is full. Please email connect@resiliencearchives.com to be added to our wait list. Wait list participants will be contacted if slots become available.


    ABOUT THE RESLIENCE ARCHIVES

    LGBTQ Asian Pacific Americans have made historic contributions to art, labor rights, and immigration reform, but their stories are truncated footnotes, if mentioned at all. APAs are the fastest growing population in the U.S., but have one of the lowest amounts of visibility in media.

    With little to no LGBTQ AAPI representation in popular culture or history, it is often up to these individuals to seek out their own community in order to hear stories and experiences. This process can be a huge struggle, resulting in conflicts of identity, religion, familial obligation, and self worth. LGBTQ AAPIs face intense discrimination and racism from mainstream LGBTQ communities, and must often choose to be LGBTQ or Asian.

    The Resilience Archives will exist online as community created history through photographs, slideshows, audio clips, multi-media, and much more. The first iteration of the project starts in the SF Bay Area with a series of four free workshops that teach practical, technical, and artistic skills in different mediums: archiving, storytelling, print media, performance arts, and film practices.

    WHO CAN PARTICIPATE

    Workshops are open to LGBTQ AAPI community, family, and allies. Due to limited space in some workshops, priority will be given to LGBTQ AAPI community members. Please view individual workshop pages to see if there are any restrictions.

    ABOUT THE COLLABORATION

    Resilience Archives is a collaboration between API Equality – Northern California (APIENC) and Visibility Project Director, artist Mia Nakano. APIENC and the Visibility Project are a part of the Asian Americans for Civil Rights and Equality Network (AACRE).

    This collaboration was made possible by the San Francisco Arts Commission’s Artists and Communities in Partnership Grant.

  • Past Events
  • ART & PERFORMANCE PRACTICE OF STORYTELLING

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    ART & PERFORMANCE PRACTICE OF STORYTELLING

    “This act of choosing—the stories we tell versus the stories we leave out—will reverberate across the rest of your life. […] Your stories are essential.” – Lin-Manuel Miranda, UPenn Graduation Speech May 16, 2016.

    There are many reason why we share our stories. For some it is a form of release. It is a way for us to reach out for support or simply feel heard. At the heart of sharing our personal stories, we are attempting to connect more deeply with others. At Guerrilla Rep, we believe that every social movement begins with one person telling their story. Your story matters and has the power to bring people together. Led by performance artist, Kat Evasco, this workshop is designed for you to explore your personal narrative and cultivate your storytelling and performance skills so that you can share your story in the most engaging way possible. It’s a great lead into the “Film & Documenting Oral Histories” workshop.

    INSTRUCTORS

    Kat Evasco: Artistic Director, Guerrilla Rep
    Mia Nakano: Director, Visibility Project

    We will be requesting that all participants sign release forms at the beginning of each workshop allowing us to publish scans, audio stories, photos, artwork and other materials created in the workshop as a part of the Resilience Archives at www.resiliencearchives.com.

    DATE & TIME

    Saturday, July 16th
    1pm – 5pm

    LOCATION

    San Francisco Public Library
    Learning Studio
    100 Larkin Street
    San Francisco, CA  94102

    CLASS LIMIT

    10 people

    Closed space for LGBTQ AAPI community

    BRING:

    Bring an object that has a significant meaning to you. It can be a rock, a photo, or an old letter – anything that is important and can be sacred.

    • Listen to a story from the Visibility Project or Dragonfruit Project for inspiration of community history. We recommend Lenore Chinn from the Visibility Project.
    • Think of significant stories or experiences that’s important to you, as an LGBTQ AAPI individual, that you may want to “perform”

    This workshop is full. Please email connect@resiliencearchives.com to be added to our wait list. Wait list participants will be contacted if slots become available.


    ABOUT THE RESLIENCE ARCHIVES

    LGBTQ Asian Pacific Americans have made historic contributions to art, labor rights, and immigration reform, but their stories are truncated footnotes, if mentioned at all. APAs are the fastest growing population in the U.S., but have one of the lowest amounts of visibility in media.

    With little to no LGBTQ AAPI representation in popular culture or history, it is often up to these individuals to seek out their own community in order to hear stories and experiences. This process can be a huge struggle, resulting in conflicts of identity, religion, familial obligation, and self worth. LGBTQ AAPIs face intense discrimination and racism from mainstream LGBTQ communities, and must often choose to be LGBTQ or Asian.

    The Resilience Archives will exist online as community created history through photographs, slideshows, audio clips, multi-media, and much more. The first iteration of the project starts in the SF Bay Area with a series of four free workshops that teach practical, technical, and artistic skills in different mediums: archiving, storytelling, print media, performance arts, and film practices.

    WHO CAN PARTICIPATE

    Workshops are open to LGBTQ AAPI community, family, and allies. Due to limited space in some workshops, priority will be given to LGBTQ AAPI community members. Please view individual workshop pages to see if there are any restrictions.

    ABOUT THE COLLABORATION

    Resilience Archives is a collaboration between API Equality – Northern California (APIENC) and Visibility Project Director, artist Mia Nakano. APIENC and the Visibility Project are a part of the Asian Americans for Civil Rights and Equality Network (AACRE).

    This collaboration was made possible by the San Francisco Arts Commission’s Artists and Communities in Partnership Grant.

  • Past Events
  • ARCHIVING PHOTOS & PERSONAL HISTORIES: Orientation & hands on archiving workshop

    ARCHIVING PHOTOS & PERSONAL HISTORY:
    Resilience Archives orientation & hands on archiving workshop

    We’ve all got pre-digital memories tucked away in closets or boxes and personal associations with them. Those keepsakes are also a part of our larger LGBTQ AAPI community story! Learn the ins and outs of how to properly archive photographs and digitize, fliers, printed media, or even objects like t-shirts, buttons, or other 3 dimensional ephemera that we’ve all collected over the years. Through this hands-on technical workshop, participants will be introduced to the best practices of archiving in this hands on technical workshop in a 3 station setup of a 35mm film scanner, professional grade flatbed scanner, and a “copy-stand” photographic workstation. You’ll be guided through the process of how to work with each station and be able to archive your own work! We’ll also discuss best practices and suggestions in storing and organizing your pre-digital media for the long-term. Contribute to our community history, empower and teach future generations, and participate in accurate storytelling. Radical librarian Sine Hwang Jensen and community photo & film archivist Mia Nakano will lead this workshop.

    INSTRUCTORS

    Sine Hwang Jensen: Librarian, UC Berkeley Ethnic Studies
    MLin: Community Organizer, API Equality – Northern California
    Mia Nakano: Director, Visibility Project

    We will be requesting that all participants sign release forms at the beginning of each workshop allowing us to publish scans, audio stories, photos, artwork and other materials created in the workshop as a part of the Resilience Archives at www.resiliencearchives.com.

    DATE & TIME

    Saturday, July 9th
    10am – 2pm

    LOCATION

    San Francisco Public Library
    Children’s Center
    100 Larkin Street
    San Francisco, CA  94102

    CLASS LIMIT

    30 people (Orientation)
    15 people (Hands-on)

    This workshop is open to the LGBTQ AAPI community, family, friends, and allies.

    BRING:

    • 35mm negatives, slides, flat photographs, fliers, newsletters, and/or objects that are related to LGBTQ AAPI history, ideally around the locations we’ve highlighted
    • You may also bring materials to leave with volunteers who will spend time archiving them the month after the workshop is over
    • A hard drive or flash drive to copy high res images onto
    • Something to take notes

    Review the map of locations we’re trying to highlight in the city . If possible, we’d like to have materials associated with those locations!


    ABOUT THE RESLIENCE ARCHIVES

    LGBTQ Asian Pacific Americans have made historic contributions to art, labor rights, and immigration reform, but their stories are truncated footnotes, if mentioned at all. APAs are the fastest growing population in the U.S., but have one of the lowest amounts of visibility in media.

    With little to no LGBTQ AAPI representation in popular culture or history, it is often up to these individuals to seek out their own community in order to hear stories and experiences. This process can be a huge struggle, resulting in conflicts of identity, religion, familial obligation, and self worth. LGBTQ AAPIs face intense discrimination and racism from mainstream LGBTQ communities, and must often choose to be LGBTQ or Asian.

    The Resilience Archives will exist online as community created history through photographs, slideshows, audio clips, multi-media, and much more. The first iteration of the project starts in the SF Bay Area with a series of four free workshops that teach practical, technical, and artistic skills in different mediums: archiving, storytelling, print media, performance arts, and film practices.

    WHO CAN PARTICIPATE

    Workshops are open to LGBTQ AAPI community, family, and allies. Due to limited space in some workshops, priority will be given to LGBTQ AAPI community members. Please view individual workshop pages to see if there are any restrictions.

    ABOUT THE COLLABORATION

    Resilience Archives is a collaboration between API Equality – Northern California (APIENC) and Visibility Project Director, artist Mia Nakano. APIENC and the Visibility Project are a part of the Asian Americans for Civil Rights and Equality Network (AACRE).

    This collaboration was made possible by the San Francisco Arts Commission’s Artists and Communities in Partnership Grant.